Help

Supreme Court Judgments

Decision Information

Decision Content

Supreme Court of Canada

Compagnie Francaise du Phenix v. Travelers Fire Insurance Co., [1952] 2 S.C.R. 190

Date: 1952-06-30

La Compagnie Française Du Phenix (Defendant) Appellant;

and

The Travelers Fire Insurance Co. (Plaintiff) Respondent.

Insurance—Fire—Contents of building—Whether objects lost in fire were part of contents—Whether variation of statutory conditions—Subrogation—Quebec Insurance Act, R.S.Q. 1941, c. 299, ss. 240, 241— Articles 1156, 1570, 1571, 2573 C.C.

The insured entered into contracts of insurance with the appellant and several other companies for a total fire insurance of $250,000, apportioned $150,000 upon the building and $100,000 on the contents. These policies were "blanket policies", identical in terms and each one limiting the issuing company's share of the total risk. The insured was authorized to augment or diminish the total amount but had to maintain an insurance "de même forme, teneur et portée" of a total of $250,000. The word "contents" was defined: "Tout ce qui se trouve dans les immeubles et qui n'est pas autrement assuré".

Subsequently the insured acquired an insurance with the respondent in the sum of $10,000 on certain "objets d'art". These were part of the contents of the buildings and initially included under the appellant's policy.

A fire having occurred, the respondent paid the full amount of the loss on the "objets d'art", took a transfer from the ensured and, as the appellant denied any liability to pay a pro rata share, brought action against him. The appellant contended that the "objets d'art" did not

[Page 191]

fall within the term "contents" in his policy since they were differently assured. The trial judge dismissed the action, but a majority in the Court of Appeal for Quebec reversed that judgment.

Held (Kellock and Fauteux JJ. dissenting) : that the appeal should be allowed and the action dismissed, since the "objets d'art" did not come within the term "contents" as defined in the appellant's policy and were, therefore, not covered by its policy at the time of the loss.

The words "qui n'est pas autrement assuré” are a part of the sentence describing the subject matter and peril insured, and are not a variation of the statutory conditions within the meaning of ss. 240, and 241 of the Quebec Insurance Act.

APPEAL from the judgment of the Court of King's Bench, appeal side, province of Quebec 1, reversing, St. Jacques and Hyde JJ.A. dissenting, the judgment of the trial judge which had dismissed the action.

A. J. Campbell Q.C. for the appellant. The property described in the policy issued by the respondent was otherwise insured within the meaning of that phrase as used in the appellant's policy and consequently was not covered by the appellant's policy. Otherwise insured means differently insured i.e., a different kind of coverage. The appellant's coverage was a blanket coverage as opposed to the respondent's coverage which was a specific one. That is the meaning that has been assumed throughout by the parties to that policy. Moreover, if it could be said that the provisions of that policy are not free from obscurity, the intention of the parties may be ascertained by taking into consideration the surrounding circumstances and by examining the conduct of the parties themselves insofar as it throws light on the interpretation they may have placed upon their contractual rights.

When one takes into consideration all of the terms of the wording, it is clear that the consent to other insurance is to other blanket insurance of the same form, range and wording. Therefore, even if the property described in the respondent's policy was not "autrement assuré", there was no consent given by the appellant to such insurance and accordingly the appellant ceased to cover.

The so-called, transfer and subrogation does not justify the institution of the action. Article 1156 C.C. does not apply, because if the appellant was in any way liable to its assured for the loss of the collection, it was liable in virtue

[Page 192]

of its obligation to its assured and not in virtue of an obligation owed by it to the assured jointly with others. In view of the fact that each company is only bound for its share, there cannot be any legal subrogation under 1156 C.C. The assured can no longer attack the policy for illegality because he has accepted the validity of that policy by the inference to be drawn from the fact that he has claimed the whole amount from the respondent. Furthermore, no subrogation was ever given by the "École" because the requirements of s. 4 of Statute 16 George V (1926), c. 49, which requires two signatures from the "École", were not met.

The sentence "tout ce qui se trouve dans les immeubles et qui n'est pas autrement assuré", used to define the contents in the appellant's policy is not a variation of the statutory conditions, because this sentence is not a condition of the policy but simply a description or limitation of the risk: Curtis's & Harvey v. North British and Mercantile Insurance Co. Ltd. 2; The London Assurance Corp. v. The Great Northern Transit Co. 3; Palatine Ins. Co. v. Gregory 4 and Ross v. Scottish Union & National Ins. 5.

John T. Hackett Q.C. and R. S. Willis for the respondent. The words "et qui n'est pas autrement assuré" come in conflict with certain conditions of the policy and in consequence are subject to the provisions of ss. 240 and 241 of the Quebec Insurance Act, and are, therefore, without binding effect on the insured. This sentence is not only descriptive of the property insured but is also a stipulation contradicting the statutory conditions. The test is not whether the stipulation is a condition or a description, but whether the stipulation varies, contradicts, etc. The W. Malcolm MacKay Co. v. The British American Ass. Co. 6 which was approved by the Privy Council in Palatine Ins. Co. v. Gregory (supra).

Even if the words were purely descriptive, they would not have the effect of freeing the appellant from the obligation to pay by virtue of Article 2573 C.C.

[Page 193]

The interpretation of the words when read in conjunction with the permission to increase or diminish the total amount of the insurance without notifying the insurers thereof, means that there had to be $250,000 of insurance at all times in like form, tenor and bearing, but once that requirement had been met with, the assured was free to increase the total amount of its insurance in any way it elected. If, however, the Court should come to the conclusion that the language is ambiguous, it should be interpreted against the appellant by the application of the rule contra proferentem.

The respondent is entitled to exercise any and all the rights of the insured. He is suing under a sale or transfer of rights. Any right may be transferred if law or policy does not forbid it. There is nothing in the Insurance Act to support the contention that the assured may not transfer his rights to impugn a variation. Considering the wording of the statute (16 George V., c. 49) and the Order in Council and that payment was payable to the Province, which got the money, then the subrogation was rightly signed and was good. The person to give the subrogation is the payee (the Province in this case) and not the assured. Article 1156 C.C. is applicable because the appellant had an interest in the payment of these indemnities.

The Chief Justice:—Telle qu'elle fut intentée, l'action de "The Travelers Fire Insurance Company" alléguait exclusivement l'émission, en date du 7 février 1940, par la Compagnie Française du Phénix (défenderesse) d'une police d'assurance contre le feu en faveur de la Corporation des Écoles techniques ou professionnelles, pour une période de trois ans depuis sa date, pour la somme de $60,000, assurant certains effets contenus dans la bâtisse de l'École Technique de Montréal, y compris l'École du Meuble.

Il y fut stipulé que l'indemnité qui pourrait devenir due, au cas de sinistre, serait payable au Gouvernement de la province de Québec.

[Page 194]

La déclaration ajoutait que, le 2 juin 1940, alors que cette police d'assurance était en vigueur, des pertes causées par le feu, au montant de $7,070.53, furent éprouvées par l'assurée aux objets suivants:

Objets d'art et des meubles faisant partie des collections du musée de l'École du Meuble, seulement lorsque contenus dans le bâtiment deux étages, construit en brique solide, avec toiture en patente, occupé comme École du Meuble, situé à Montréal, Province de Québec, et portant le N° 2020 rue Kimberley.

L'intimée ajoutait que ces objets étaient également assurés, en outre de la Compagnie Française du Phénix, par la Compagnie d'Assurance du Canada contre l'incendie, au montant de $10,000; La Nationale, Compagnie Anonyme d'Assurance contre l'Incendie et les Explosions, pour le même montant; "Commerce Mutual Fire Insurance Company", "The Stanstead & Sherbrooke Fire Insurance Company", "The Mercantile Fire Insurance Company" et "The Missisquoi & Rouville Mutual Fire Insurance Company", conjointement pour un montant de $20,000; et par l'intimée elle-même, "The Travelers Fire Insurance Company", pour un montant de $10,000.

Chacune de ces polices d'assurance, sauf celle de l'intimée, stipulait que l'assurance porterait sur le contenu des immeubles de l'appelante et que l'on devrait entendre par "contenu": "tout ce qui se trouve dans les immeubles et qui n'est pas autrement assuré."

L'appelante prétendait que cette stipulation était une variation des conditions statutaires n° 9 et que, comme elle n'était pas indiquée dans la police en la manière exigée par la loi, elle était en conséquence sans effet légal et n'engageait pas l'assurée.

Les pertes totales causées par l'incendie déjà mentionné s'élevèrent à $76,852.14 et chacun des assureurs paya en conséquence sa part respective de ce montant de $76,852.14, moins $3,000 supportés par "The Phoenix Assurance Company, Limited, of London, England", en vertu d'une autre police d'assurance.

L'appelante, cependant, refusa de payer une somme de $1,939.85, représentant sa part dans le montant de $7,070.53 pour l'indemnité due sur les objets d'art et autres meubles énumérés plus haut.

[Page 195]

L'intimée se fit donc subroger par l'École du Meuble et le Gouvernement de la province de Québec dans leurs droits contre l'appelante, et, après en avoir signifié le document de subrogation à l'appelante, l'intimée intenta contre cette dernière l'action dont il s'agit dans la présente cause.

C'était là tout ce qui était allégué dans la déclaration par laquelle l'action a débuté.

L'appelante produisit une plaidoirie écrite niant que la police d'assurance, en vertu de laquelle elle pouvait être tenue responsable, contint une variation aux conditions statutaires, et que les mots "tout ce qui se trouve dans les immeubles et qui n'est pas autrement assuré" fussent autre chose que la description de l'objet de l'assurance; qu'elle avait acquitté tout ce qu'elle devait à la Corporation des Écoles techniques ou professionnelles, ainsi qu'au Gouvernement de la province de Québec, comme représentant sa proportion dans le montant de $76,852.14; et que la somme de $7,070.53, à laquelle référait la déclaration de l'intimée, était uniquement la responsabilité de cette dernière qui, en la payant au Gouvernement de la province de Québec, n'avait fait rien autre chose que d'acquitter sa propre dette.

Jusque là, il ne s'agissait donc que d'une action bien simple dans laquelle l'intimée alléguant le paiement et la subrogation faite en sa faveur en réclamait la part de l'appelante.

Il n'était donc aucunement question d'une action récursoire, où l'intimée aurait allégué avoir payé pour le compte de l'appelante et lui en aurait demandé le remboursement.

Ce n'est que dans la réponse que l'on trouve au paragraphe 5 de l'allégation suivante:

5. That Defendent, with the other Insurers mentioned in paragraph 3 of the Declaration, is liable for its respective share of the total loss of $7,070.53, with interest thereon from the 2nd day of August, 1940.

Il apparaît au dossier et cela est confirmé par l'information que nous possédons, qu'une action semblable fut instituée par l'intimée contre les autres compagnies d'assurance déjà mentionnées et il fut convenu que la preuve et l'enquête seraient communes à chacune de ces actions.

Il ne fait pas de doute que cette nouvelle allégation contenue dans la réponse non seulement aurait dû se trouver dans la déclaration, mais que, comme elle n'y

[Page 196]

était pas, même si l'intimée avait demandé la permission au tribunal de l'introduire par voie d'amendement, il est improbable que cette permission eût pu être accordée, vu qu'elle changeait complètement la nature de l'action de l'intimée et qu'elle avait pour effet de transformer une simple action directe contre l'appelante en exercice des droits du Gouvernement de la province de Québec et de l'assurée en une action récursoire.

Cependant, l'appelante a négligé de se prévaloir de la possibilité de faire rejeter cette allégation de la réponse, qui est restée dans les plaidoiries écrites, tant en Cour Supérieure qu'en Cour du Banc de la Reine (en appel), et il semble bien que la Cour Suprême n'a pas d'autre alternative que de considérer le litige à la fois comme comportant une action directe et une action récursoire, même en dépit du fait qu'il soit douteux que cela ne constitue pas un cumul de recours incompatibles ou contradictoires ne tendant pas à des condamnations de même nature où l'appelante, par voie d'exception dilatoire, eût pu contraindre l'intimée à 'aire option, en vertu de l'article 177 du Code de Procédure Civile.

A notre humble avis, cette situation met l'appelante dans une position défavorable. Sur la déclaration, telle que rédigée d'abord, elle n'avait qu'à rencontrer la réclamation de l'assurée et à lui opposer, entre autres, le contrat d'assurance par lequel l'assurée se trouvait liée au moins par acquiescement. Au contraire, lorsque l'intimée ajoute aux droits dans lesquels elle a été subrogée la prétention qu'elle n'a fait que payer une somme due par l'appelante et qu'elle est autorisée à se faire rembourser par cette dernière, il s'agit alors d'un droit tout différent où les moyens de défense de l'appelante ne sont plus les mêmes.

L'appelante n'aurait qu'à se blâmer elle-même si cela devait tourner à son désavantage. Mais je ne vois pas comment nous pouvons traiter la cause comme si le paragraphe 5 de la réponse ne se trouvait pas au dossier.

Il importe tout d'abord de signaler que la police d'assurance émise par l'intimée était d'une nature différente de celle des autres compagnies. Alors que les autres polices d'assurance couvraient "le contenu des bâtiments décrits à l'article précédent" et également "les choses, décrites ci-après sous le titre "contenu" se trouvant dans un rayon

[Page 197]

de 50 pieds" des bâtiments, alors que le "contenu" était décrit comme "tout ce qui se trouve dans les immeubles et qui n'est pas autrement assuré", la police de l'intimée, au contraire, était spécifique et ne couvrait que les "objets d'art et autres meubles faisant partie des collections du musée de l'École du Meuble".

Même en envisageant le paragraphe 5 de la réponse de l'intimée, il est donc tout à fait inexact de dire que cette dernière était sur un pied d'égalité avec les autres compagnies d'assurance.

L'appelante et les six autres compagnies assuraient les mêmes objets, bien que pour des montants différents, à savoir: "tout ce qui se trouve dans les immeubles et qui n'est pas autrement assuré". Du moment que ce qui se trouvait dans les immeubles et qui n'était pas autrement assuré lors de l'incendie était détruit par le feu, chacune des six compagnies, ainsi que l'appelante, devenait responsable pour la perte dans la proportion du montant pour lequel chacune avait assuré. Mais le détenteur de ces polices, propriétaire de ce qui était contenu dans les immeubles, avait stipulécomme il en avait le droitque ces polices ne couvriraient pas ce qui était autrement assuré. Il lui appartenait de décider pour lui-même la nature de la police d'assurance qu'il désirait obtenir et l'étendue du risque dont chaque police répondrait.

L'assurée consentit, entre autres, avec l'appelante, un contrat par lequel cette dernière s'est obligée, moyennant une rémunération, appelée prime, à certaines prestations, au cas où se réaliseraient certaines éventualités (à savoir: l'incendie), relative à des biens déterminés dans la police. Il fut convenu entre l'assureur et l'assurée que les biens pour la perte desquels l'assurée aurait le droit de réclamer une indemnité seraient ceux qui se trouveraient dans les immeubles de l'assurée, au moment de l'incendie, mais ne comprendraient pas ceux qui étaient "autrement assurés".

Je ne puis me convaincre qu'il ne s'agit pas là de la description des objets assurés et que ceux qui étaient "autrement assurés" se trouvaient par le fait même de cette autre assurance soustraits à la description et cessaient d'être assurés par la police de l'appelante. C'est bien ainsi que toutes les autres compagnies d'assurance intéressées ont compris la convention. Chacune d'elle a opposé à l'action

[Page 198]

de l'intimée la même contestation que celle de l'appelante. Elles étaient toutes réunies devant la Cour Supérieure et devant la Cour du Banc de la Reine (en appel). A la suite du jugement de cette dernière Cour, les autres compagnies d'assurance n'ont pas jugé à propos de persister; elles se sont simplement soumises au jugement qui les condamnait. Par là, elles ont été contraintes de payer, mais il n'y faut voir aucun acquiescement; et, d'ailleurs, l'acquiescement des autres compagnies ne saurait être invoqué contre l'appelante. Si elle a raison, le fait que les compagnies qui étaient sur le même pied qu'elle ont fini par céder ne saurait prévaloir contre son droit à elle.

Mais il résulte inéluctablement que, lorsque l'École du Meuble a décidé d'assurer spécialement les objets d'art et les autres meubles spécifiquement décrits dans la police d'assurance de l'intimée, ces objets d'art et ces autres meubles se sont trouvés autrement assurés par l'intimée, et, par le fait même, ont cessé d'être assurés par l'appelante et les autres compagnies. Il s'ensuit que, lorsque l'intimée a invoqué contre l'appelante les droits que prétendaient posséder l'École du Meuble et le Gouvernement de la province de Québec, elle a voulu tenir l'appelante responsable de la perte d'objets qui n'étaient plus assurés par l'appelante. Vainement l'intimée aurait-elle prétendu que l'École du Meuble n'avait pas le droit de prendre une autre assurance ou une assurance supplémentaire, car, en outre que cette question ne pouvait être soulevée que par La Compagnie Française du Phénix, ou par les six autres compagnies qui avaient assumé le risque originairement, si cette assurance supplémentaire constituait une infraction à leur convention, c'eut été là une objection appartenant exclusivement à chacune de ces compagnies, ainsi qu'à l'appelante, et l'intimée ne pouvait la soulever. En le faisant, l'intimée eut excipé du droit d'autrui.

D'ailleurs, le problème ne se pose pas puisque les polices d'assurance elles-mêmes émises par l'appelante et les six autres compagnies autorisaient l'assurée à obtenir cette police d'assurance supplémentaire.

La Cour Supérieure a maintenu l'action de l'intimée en étant d'avis que les mots "qui n'est pas autrement assuré" ne faisaient pas partie de la description des objets qui se trouvaient assurés par l'appelante au moment de l'incendie,

[Page 199]

mais en les considérant comme une variation des conditions statutaires. Et, comme ces mots n'étaient pas inscrits dans la police d'assurance conformément aux exigences de la Loi de Québec, elle a décidé que l'École du Meuble n'était pas liée par eux et que l'appelante ne pouvait pas en avoir le bénéfice. Elle cite la décision du Conseil Privé dans Curtis's & Harvey v. North British and Mercantile Insurance Company Limited 7 et un passage du jugement de Lord Dunedin qui, à mon humble point de vue, me paraît contraire aux prétentions de l'intimée. Il se lit comme suit:

Their Lordships think that it is the policy of the statute to make a hard and fast rule that every fire policy shall have attached to it these statutory conditions, and that they cannot be varied so as to be binding on the insured, unless the variations are authenticated in the prescribed manner. The result will be that, "if not varied, they remain in full force, but any other stipulation and covenant which may define or limit the risk can also receive effect in so far as it does not contradict the statutory conditions which are paramount."

Il y est bien dit: "but any other stipulation and covenant which may define or limit the risk can also receive effect in so far as it does not contradict the statutory conditions which are 'paramount'. "

La Cour Supérieure cite encore un jugement de notre Cour dans The London Assurance Corporation v. The Great Northern Transit Co. 8. Voici le passage en question :

In this case the policy insured the SS. Baltic whilst running in the inland rivers and canals during the season of navigation. To be laid up in a case of safety during the winter months from any extra hazardous building.

Sedgewick J. at page 583:—

One other point remains. It is contended that the stipulation contained in the words "whilst running" etc., is a condition without the meaning of the Ontario Insurance Act, and in as much as it varies from or is in addition to the conditions by that Act made statutory the policy should comply with section 115 of the Act which provides that such variations or additions should be printed in conspicuous type and in ink of different colour. So far as this point is concerned, I entirely agree with the view taken by the learned Chief Justice of the Court of Appeal and Mr. Justice Osler. The stipulation in question is in no sense a condition but rather a description of the subject matter insured. It is descriptive of and has reference solely to the risk covered by the policy and, not to the happening of an event which by the statutory conditions would render the policy void. The statute, therefore, does not apply.

[Page 200]

De nouveau, cette Cour a décidé que les mots "whilst running in the inland rivers and canals during the season of navigation" n'étaient aucunement une condition mais plutôt une description de l'objet assuré.

A un moment de son jugement, la Cour Supérieure semble s'être demandée si les mots "non autrement assuré" pouvaient être considérés comme une garantie, mais elle paraît avoir écarté cette prétention.

En effet, il paraîtrait surprenant qu'un propriétaire qui assure garantirait qu'il maintiendrait sur les lieux, jusqu'à l'époque de l'incendie, les effets pour lesquels il a demandé une assurance. Tout simplement la police d'assurance ne couvre pas autre chose que la perte des effets qui se trouvent sur les lieux au moment de l'incendie et l'assuré ne peut réclamer rien d'autre. Cet argument équivaudrait à prétendre qu'un propriétaire assuré s'engage à ne jamais éliminer de son immeuble les effets qui s'y trouvaient lorsque la police d'assurance a été émise. Or, c'est lui-même qui a stipulé que cette police ne couvrirait que les effets qui n'étaient pas autrement assurés à l'époque de l'incendie et il aurait les mains liées pour l'empêcher d'assurer autrement ces mêmes effets.

Autant dit pour la question de savoir quelle est la nature de cette stipulation ("et qui n'est pas autrement assuré") et si vraiment elle est autre chose que la désignation ou la description des effets qui se trouveront assurés au moment de l'incendie.

Mais j'avoue comprendre encore moins la prétention que cette stipulation serait contraire aux conditions statutaires qui, en définitive, semble le motif de la décision de la Cour Supérieure et celui de la majorité de la Cour du Banc de la Reine (en appel) 9.

J'insiste sur le fait qu'il faut y trouver un changement aux conditions de la police d'assurance aux termes de l'article 241 de la Loi des Assurances de. Québec, c'est-à-dire, une variation des conditions mentionnées dans cette Loi. Or, je cherche encore en quoi l'addition des mots "et qui n'est pas autrement assuré" peut être considérée comme une variation des conditions statutaires, car il ne s'agit pas évidemment de ce que l'intimée semble soumettre

[Page 201]

d'une prétendue contradiction entre les mots en question et les autres stipulations de la police d'assurance. Il faut nécessairement pour que ces mots aient été illégalement introduits dans la police d'assurance de l'appelante qu'ils constituent un changement aux conditions statutaires proprement dites et qu'ils n'y aient pas été imprimés en caractères voyants et en encre d'une couleur différente. Ce n'est certainement pas l'article 7 des conditions statutaires avec lequel l'on pourrait dire que les mots en discussion entrent en conflit. Je n'ai même pas besoin de le reproduire, car cela est évident.

Ce n'est pas, non plus, à l'article 8 des conditions statutaires que les mots incriminés comportent une dérogation. Cet article est à l'effet que la compagnie d'assurance n'est pas responsable de la perte, s'il y a quelque autre assurance antérieure dans une autre compagnie "à moins que le consentement de la compagnie à cet effet n'apparaisse dans la police ou au dos de la police ou à moins que la compagnie n'ait fait défaut de s'y opposer par écrit dans les deux semaines après avoir reçu un avis par écrit de l'intention ou du désir d'effectuer l'assurance subséquente, ou ne s'oppose par écrit après ce temps, mais avant que l'assurance subséquente ou additionnelle soit effectuée." Or, en l'espèce, le consentement de la compagnie d'assurance à augmenter ou à diminuer le montant total des assurances est clairement prévu dans les clauses de la police de l'appelante. Mais, d'ailleurs, ce serait là une objection ou une défense qui appartiendrait à la compagnie d'assurance appelante et ce ne serait sûrement pas l'assurée qui pourrait invoquer une pareille contravention au contratsi cette contravention existaitdont elle se serait elle-même rendue coupable. De toute façon, je ne vois pas en quoi les mots "et qui n'est pas autrement assuré" pourraient venir en conflit avec cet article 8.

Il reste l'article 9 qui pourvoit que dans le cas où une autre assurance aurait été prise sur la propriété décrite, au cas où telle autre assurance serait encore en vigueur au moment de la perte, chaque compagnie d'assurance n'est responsable que pour sa part ou sa proportion de la perte ou du dommage, sans tenir compte des dates des différentes polices d'assurance.

[Page 202]

Je continue de me demander en quoi l'addition des mots "et qui n'est pas autrement assuré" vient en conflit avec cet article des conditions statutaires. L'on prétend que l'effet de l'insertion de ces mots enlève à chaque compagnie et, en particulier, à l'intimée, je suppose, le droit d'exiger le paiement de sa part par les autres compagnies. Que l'on remarque bien qu'il s'agit d'une "autre assurance sur la propriété décrite dans la police", c'est-à-dire, sur la même propriété. Je ne me demande pas si les autres compagnies d'assurance qui avaient émis une police semblable à celle de l'appelante, auraient pu prétendre que c'était là une dérogation à l'article 9. La question ne se pose pas, bien qu'il est juste de faire remarquer que chacune des six autres compagnies d'assurance a soulevé, à l'encontre de la réclamation de l'intimée, la même objection que l'appelante fait dans le présent appel et que, je le répète, elles ne se sont soumises qu'à la suite du jugement de la Cour du Banc de la Reine (en appel) qu'elles n'ont pas jugé à propos de porter devant la Cour Suprême du Canada, ainsi que le fait l'appelante présentement. Mais en quoi l'intimée, avec une police d'assurance différente, qui couvre des objets d'art et des meubles dont l'assurée elle-même a stipulé que ces objets, étant autrement assurés, cesseraient d'être assurés par l'appelante, peut-elle prétendre que l'article 9 s'applique à elle? Au moment de la perte, l'intimée assurait des objets d'art et des meubles pour lesquels elle avait spécifiquement assumé le risque et ces mêmes objets d'art et ces meubles avaient cessé d'être assurés, ou avaient été soustraits à la police d'assurance de l'appelante, par l'acte de l'assurée elle-même. C'est cette dernière qui a jugé à propos d'assurer spécialement les objets d'art et les meubles en question et qui avait stipulé que, dès le moment où elle les assurait autrement, l'appelante cesserait d'en être responsable par le fait qu'ils étaient autrement assurés.

De toute façon, je m'accorde avec les jugements dissidents de MM. les Juges St-Jacques et Hyde et, en réalité, je ne fais vraiment que réaffirmer les arguments et les motifs

[Page 203]

contenus dans ces jugements. Je suis même impressionné par ce passage des raisons de M. le juge Casey, qui a signé le jugement formel de la Cour, et qui se lit comme suit:

I am prepared to concede that the words "autrement assuré" limit the risk. Also I take as established that when the fire occurred the effects in question were insured under a policy separate and distinct from those issued by respondents. What I cannot accept however, is the conclusion drawn by respondents from these two premises; I cannot admit as a conclusion that the goods were excluded by the descriptive words "autrement assuré".

Bien respectueusement, du moment que l'on concède que les mots "autrement assuré" limitent le risque, il m'est impossible de suivre le savant juge dans sa conclusion. Si les mots cités limitent le risque, dès lors ils font partie de la description du risque, et "tout ce qui, lors de l'incendie, se trouvait dans les immeubles et qui était autrement assuré"à savoir, assuré par la compagnie intiméen'était pas assuré par la compagnie appelante.

Et il est important de se rendre compte à quelle conséquence nous conduirait la prétention de l'intimée et le jugement dont est fait appel. Cela équivaudrait ni plus ni moins à dire que l'appelante pourrait être appelée à contribuer à la perte d'effets qu'elle n'assurait pas.

Pour toutes ces raisons, j'en viens donc à la conclusion que l'appel doit être maintenu et que l'action de l'intimée doit être rejetée, avec dépens, dans toutes les Cours.

Taschereau J.:Plusieurs de mes collègues, dont j'ai eu l'avantage de lire les notes, ont rapporté les faits de cette cause. Il serait en conséquence superflu de les exposer au complet de nouveau. Je désire cependant ajouter les considérations suivantes pour lesquelles, je crois que l'appel qui nous est soumis doit être maintenu.

Les polices émises contre le feu, au bénéfice de La Corporation des Écoles Techniques ou Professionnelles de Montréal, qui comprend l'École du Meuble, l'ont été par les compagnies suivantes:

La Compagnie Française du Phénix .................................................                    $150,000 00

La Compagnie d'Assurance du Canada

contre l'Incendie ...........................................................................                            25,000 00

La Nationale de Paris ........................................................................                     25,000 00

La Stanstead & Sherbrooke Fire Insurance

Company et al ..............................................................................                            50,000 00

Total .........................................................................                                                  $250,000 00

[Page 204]

Ces compagnies ont assumé l'obligation d'indemniser l'assurée contre l'incendie, mais leur risque était limité à $150,000 sur les immeubles et à $100,000 sur leur contenu, et la responsabilité de chacune était proportionnelle au montant de la police. Il a été convenu entre l'assurée et les compagnies d'assurance, dans des polices rédigées de façon identique, que la Corporation s'engageait à maintenir "en vigueur une assurance de même forme, teneur et portée au montant total de $250,000, divisé à raison de $150,000 sur les bâtiments et de $100,000 sur le contenu." En outre, l'assurée a été autorisée "à augmenter ou à diminuer le montant total de ses assurances sans en avertir les assureurs; ceux-ci renonçant au préavis pour toute assurance souscrite antérieurement ou postérieurement au présent contrat."

Toutes ces polices sont ce que l'on est convenu d'appeler des "blanket policies", ou si l'on aime mieux des polices susceptibles de fluctuations ou de changements et qui couvrent des biens en général, plutôt que des biens spécifiques et déterminés. (Black, Law Dictionary, 3rd Edition, page 226).

Les clauses 8 et 9 des conditions statutaires de ces polices se lisent ainsi:

8. La compagnie n'est pas responsable de la perte, s'il y a quelqu'autre assurance antérieure dans une autre compagnie, à moins que le consentement de la compagnie à cet effet n'apparaisse dans la police ou au dos de la police, ou si quelqu'autre assurance subséquente est effectuée par une autre compagnie, à moins et avant que la compagnie n'y consente, ou à moins que la compagnie n'ait fait défaut de s'y opposer par écrit dans les deux semaines après avoir reçu un avis par écrit de l'intention ou du désir d'effectuer l'assurance subséquente, ou ne s'oppose par écrit après ce temps mais avant que l'assurance, subséquente ou additionnelle soit effectuée.

9. Dans le cas où il y a eu consentement comme susdit à toute autre assurance sur la propriété décrite dans cette police, cette compagnie, si telle autre assurance reste en vigueur, advenant une perte ou un dommage, n'est responsable que du paiement d'une partie proportionnelle de cette perte ou de ce dommage sans égard aux dates des différentes polices.

Il résulte de ceci que l'assurée devait toujours maintenir ses polices à $250,000, "de mêmes force, teneur et portée", qu'elle avait le droit de les augmenter, mais de ne jamais les réduire à un niveau plus bas que celui stipulé, qu'elle pouvait agir ainsi sans donner avis à ses assureurs par suite du consentement écrit de ces derniers, et que dans

[Page 205]

le cas d'incendie, toutes les compagnies d'assurance, même celles qui avaient émis des polices subséquentes, étaient tenues proportionnellement au paiement des pertes, sans égard à la date des polices.

Or, il est arrivé que la Corporation des Écoles Techniques ou Professionnelles de Montréal, quelque temps après s'être assurée avec les compagnies précédemment mentionnées, a fait émettre par l'intimée, La Travelers Fire Insurance Company, une nouvelle police couvrant jusqu'à concurrence de $10,000, les effets suivants:

$10,000. Sur Objets d'Art et des meubles faisant partie des collections du musée de l'École du Meuble, seulement lorsque contenus le bâtiment à deux étages, construit en brique solide, avec toiture en patente, occupé comme École du Meuble, situé à Montréal, Province de Québec, et portant le No. 2020 rue Kimberley.

Après un incendie, dont les dommages se sont élevés à $76,852.14, survenu le 2 juin 1940, les comptes ont été payés et l'intimée a déboursé la somme de $7,070.53 pour les effets qu'elle avait assurés. Elle a réclamé de la Compagnie Française du Phénix, en vertu de la clause 9 des conditions statutaires, sa proportion du risque, soit $1,939.85 plus les intérêts, ce qui forme un montant supérieur à $2,000, nécessaire pour donner juridiction à cette Cour. Cette réclamation a été rejetée par la Cour Supérieure, mais maintenue par la Cour d'Appel 10, MM. les juges St-Jacques et Hyde étant dissidents.

L'intimée, qui a payé en totalité la somme de $7,070.53, a été subrogée dans les droits de l'assurée contre ses co-assureurs, mais nous n'avons à considérer que sa réclamation contre l'appelante-défenderesse. Celle-ci invoque l'une des clauses de la police qu'elle a émise et qui par l'opération de la subrogation limiterait les droits de l'appelante à ceux de l'assurée. Cette clause est à l'effet que La Compagnie Française du Phénix assure le contenu des immeubles de La Corporation des Écoles Techniques ou Professionnelles, mais est exclu du risque, "tout ce qui n'est pas autrement assuré." L'appelante prétend que les "objets d'art de l'École du Meuble", étant assurés par la police de la Travelers Fire Insurance, il en résulterait que l'appelante ne pourrait être appelée de même que ses co-assureurs à partager proportionnellement avec l'intimée qui seule aurait assumé ce risque.

[Page 206]

Je m'accorde avec cette prétention, non pas parce qu'il existe une autre police d'assurance émise par la Travelers, qu'en vertu des polices l'assurée avait incontestablement le droit de prendre, mais parce qu'il existe une police "différente" que celles déjà émises, et qu'en conséquence, l'assurée est "autrement assurée" aux termes mêmes de la police qui limite ainsi les obligations de l'appelante. "Autrement assurée" a nécessairement le sens de "différemment assurée."

Les compagnies d'assurance ont voulu, et c'est le risque qu'elles ont assumé en considération de la prime qui leur a été versée, que des polices de "mêmes forme, teneur et portée", que celles émises par elles, atteignent toujours la somme de $250,000 avec permission de dépasser ce montant. Il était donc essentiel que chaque police additionnelle, pour qu'intervienne la responsabilité proportionnelle, soit une police générale (blanket policy). Lorsque, comme c'était son droit, l'assurée a fait émettre une police additionnelle sur des biens "spécifiques", comme dans le cas qui nous occupe, les effets assurés sont devenus "autrement" c'est-à-dire "différemment assurés" et ont cessé de faire partie du risque couvert par l'appelante. Ils en ont été soustraits par la volonté même des parties contractantes.

Il est rationnel qu'il en soit ainsi, et que les quatre compagnies d'assurance qui ont émis les premières polices, consentent à partager le risque avec d'autres compagnies qui émettent des polices identiques, mais refusent de le faire avec d'autres qui assurent hors leur connaissance, les biens d'une façon différente. C'est précisément pour cela qu'on y insère cette clause qui exclut les objets "autrement assurés." Ignorer ces mots serait les effacer de la police. Il faut nécessairement leur donner un sens. Le pouvoir qui est donné à l'assurée d'augmenter ses assurances générales, ne vient nullement en conflit avec la clause qui exempte de responsabilité les assureurs des biens "autrement assurés."

[Page 207]

Comme second moyen l'intimée invoque l'article 241 de la Loi des assurances, c. 299, S.R.Q. 1941, qui se lit ainsi:

241. Si l'assureur désire faire des changements aux conditions de la police, en omettre quelqu'une ou en ajouter de nouvelles, il doit être ajouté au contrat contenant les conditions imprimées, des mots à l'effet suivant, imprimés en caractères voyants et en encre d'une couleur différente :

"CHANGEMENTS DANS LES CONDITIONS"

Cette police est émise sous les conditions ci-dessus avec les changements et les additions qui suivent: (énoncer les changements et les additions).

"Ces changements sont faits en vertu de la Loi des assurances de Québec et restent en vigueur en autant que le tribunal ou le juge auquel sera soumise une question s'y rattachant, considérera juste et raisonnable de la part de la compagnie d'en exiger l'application."

Aucun tel changement, addition ou omission, à moins d'être distinctement exposé de la manière indiquée dans le présent article n'est légal ou obligatoire pour l'assuré.

C'est la prétention de l'intimée qu'il y a eu une variation des conditions statutaires, qui ne lie pas l'assurée, parce qu'on aurait omis d'indiquer en encre de couleur différente que l'assureur, pour les biens "autrement assurés" ne participera pas proportionnellement dans le cas d'incendie. Je suis d'opinion que ce moyen est non fondé, car il ne s'agit pas d'une condition, mais plutôt d'une limitation de responsabilité. C'est une description des biens assurés qu'on a voulu faire et ça a été l'intention des parties de déterminer la quantité et l'identité des objets que la police devait couvrir. L'appelante et l'intimée n'ont pas assuré les mêmes biens. Il ne peut être question de paiement proportionnel.

Enfin, il est inutile, à cause de ma conclusion, d'examiner la question de savoir si le transfert avec subrogation, obtenu par la demanderesse-intimée était suffisant pour la justifier d'instituer la présente action.

L'appel doit donc être maintenu, et l'action rejetée avec dépens de toutes les cours.

The dissenting judgment of Kellock and Fauteux JJ. was delivered by

Kellock J. :—The policy here in question was issued on February 7, 1940, by the appellant in a form common to a number of other policies issued concurrently therewith by companies underwriting a total sum of $250,000, of

[Page 208]

which $150,000 was on buildings and $100,000 on their contents, the share of this insurance taken by the appellant being $150,000. The relevant provisions, which I have numbered for convenience of reference, are as follows :

$100,000. Sur le contenu des bâtiments décrits à l'article précédent et sur les choses décrites ci-après sous le titre "contenu" se trouvant dans un rayon de 50 pieds de ceux-ci.

1. L'on entendra

par contenu: tout ce qui se trouve dans les immeubles et qui n'est pas autrement assuré . . . .

(This is followed by an enumeration including therein articles which would otherwise have been excluded from the coverage by statutory condition 7.)

2. L'assurance portera sur ce qui appartient à l'assurée, sur les choses qui, vendues, n'auraient pas encore été livrées et sur celles qui lui sont confiées à titre de commissionnaire, de consignataire ou pour réparation et enfin, sur tout ce dont elle peut être tenue responsable.

3. L'assurance portera également sur les choses que l'assurée achète à tempérament et sur lesquelles elle a un droit de détenteur précaire, sous condition suspensive en vertu du contrat de vente portant que le titre de propriété reviendra à l'assurée une fois le prix entièrement payé.

4. L'assurée s'engage à maintenir en vigueur une assurance de mêmes forme, teneur et portée au montant total de $250,000, divisé à raison de $150,000 sur les bâtiments et de $100,000 sur le contenu. Si elle ne se conforme pas à cette convention, l'assurée deviendra co-assureur pour le déficit.

5. L'assurée est autorisée:

a) à augmenter ou à diminuer le montant total de ses assurances sans en avertir les assureurs; ceux-ci renoncent au préavis pour toute assurance souscrite antérieurement ou postérieurement au présent contrat. Cette prérogative ne libère pas l'assurée, cependant, de la convention relative au montant minimum d'assurance mentionné précédemment.

The position of the appellant is that the words "qui n'est pas autrement assuré" in para. 1 form part of the description of the risk and that as, at the time of the loss, part of the contents were insured under the respondent's policy, such goods ceased to be covered by the policy of the appellant, with the result that the latter is under no obligation to contribute to the loss. The respondent, on the other hand, contends that its policy was issued within the permission provided for by para. 5 and that, by reason of statutory condition 9, the appellant is liable for a rateable proportion of the loss and that the language in para. 1 upon which the appellant relies, cannot be given effect as against the statutory condition.

[Page 209]

It is undoubted that the words, the meaning of which is in dispute, viz. "qui n'est pas autrement assuré", taken alone, might very well be considered to come within the principle of such a case as London Assurance Co. v. Great Northern Transit Co. 11, as forming part of the description of the risk, with the result for which the appellant contends. In Republic Fire Ins. Co. v. Strong 12, a case in this court, not reported in the regular reports, the policy provided that

This policy does not attach to or become insurance upon property herein described which at the time of any loss is otherwise insured, until the liability of such other insurance has been exhausted, and shall then cover only such loss or damage as may exceed the amount due from such insurance.

It was held that under such a policy there could be no contribution. The coverage according to its terms, applied only after all other insurance had been paid.

Coming back to the case in hand, if a policy were written so as to provide coverage only until or so long as the property insured should not be covered by any other insurance, a clause in such a policy giving the assured permission to effect other insurance could have no relevancy, to say nothing, for the moment, as to a clause permitting the assured to "increase" his insurance. An insurer whose policy is to cease to cover upon any other insurance being effected on the insured property has no interest in giving permission to his assured to effect other insurance. Such permission is only relevant to prevent the avoidance, by the operation of statutory condition 8, of the existing insurance if further insurance is effected. But under a policy such as I am now considering, that result would be effected by the terms of the policy itself.

Accordingly, a provision that the policy will cease to attach if other insurance is effected, and a provision in the same policy that the assured may "increase" his insurance, assuming, as it does, that the policy which contains that permission will continue, are prima facie antagonistic. It is therefore necessary, in the case at bar, to scrutinize these provisions to see if the repugnancy may be resolved.

[Page 210]

The words "autrement assuré" which, according to Larousse, are the equivalent of "d'une autre façon assuré," considered apart from any context, are capable of more than one meaning, namely, that the interest of the assured (1) is not already insured; (2) will not be insured by any other insurer at the time of loss; (3) will not be covered by insurance taken out at the instance of any other person.

The appellant contends for still another meaning, namely, that, as put in its factum,

not insured otherwise than in virtue of the blanket coverage provided by the appellant's policy.

This contention is explained to mean that if at the time of any loss there is in existence any other insurance effected by the assured on the goods which does not cover the entire contents and which is not of the same "forme, teneur et portée" as the appellant's policy, the goods, or any specific part of them so covered, will be "autrement assuré" within the meaning of the appellant's policy and not covered thereby.

This meaning for which the appellant contends is not, as already pointed out, a meaning which the words in question bear when taken by themselves without a context. Such a result is only to be reached by reading into para. 1 words which are not there, but which are to be found only in para. 4. To reach such a result it is necessary for the appellant, as it does, to contend further that the same words are also to be read into para. 5 so as to qualify the permission provided by that paragraph. Unless the clear language of para. 5 is to be thus modified, this whole contention falls. There are, in my view, a number of reasons why the contention cannot be accepted.

In the first place, unlike the words in question in para. 1, which are capable of more than meaning, the language used in para. 5 is perfectly clear and proceeds on the basis that if the permission which it contains is acted upon, either in the continuance of insurance already existing upon the goods at the date of issue of appellant's policy or by the placing of additional insurance, the insurance provided by the appellant's policy and those of the other members of the group will remain in force. No other effect can be given to the word "augmenter."

[Page 211]

Further, the words which Mr. Campbell seeks to read into para. 5 are to be found only in para. 4, and it is to be observed that para. 5 expressly refers to para. 4, but for one purpose only, namely, to make it perfectly clear that the permission given by para. 5 to "diminuer" the total amount of insurance is not to free the assured from the obligation imposed upon him by para. 4, to keep in force insurance to the extent of $100,000 at least. The reference to the latter paragraph has nothing at all to do with "augmenting" the insurance beyond $100,000.

Again, it is to be observed that the notice which is dispensed with by para. 5 is notice with respect to "any" insurance, even though already in existence. As paras. 1 to 5 inclusive are not to be found in the standard printed portion of the policy but are specially typed-in clauses, it would be the merest chance that existing insurance at the time the appellant's policy was effected would be found to be of the same "forme, teneur et portée." This consideration alone is sufficient to show that the parties had no intention, when providing for renunciation of notice with respect to "toute" insurance, of using that word in any sense other than the word ordinarily bears, namely, that permission was granted to the assured to maintain "any" existing insurance, whether blanket or covering specific goods only, no matter what the form of the contract. It follows that the intention was the same with respect to subsequent insurance. It may be observed also at this point that the same considerations render inapt the first two possible meanings of the language of para. 1 set out above.

Mr. Campbell argues, however, that the respondent, by its act in effecting the respondent's policy, adopted the construction of the appellant's policy for which he contends. Mr. Campbell says that the respondent's policy was for the full value of the specific property to which it applied and that the assured thus recognized that the appellant's policy no longer applied to that property.

In considering this contention, it will be convenient to refer first to the other insurance effected by the assured on May 31, 1940, on specific property, namely, the policy for $3,000 in the Phoenix of London upon property loaned to the assured by a number of named firms for exhibition

[Page 212]

purposes. The actual loss with respect to this last-mentioned property due to the fire in question, which occurred on June 2, 1940, was $5,248.19. It would appear hardly likely that the assured, in effecting a policy for only $3,000 on this property, did so with the intention that he would thereby bring about a situation in which the policies of the appellant and the other members of the group would cease to attach to this property, thereby causing this property to be uninsured for over forty per cent of its value. I do not think, with respect, that it can be reasonably argued that the assured had any such intention, or that its intention was other than to provide, by the additional insurance, ample coverage in case the protection provided by the group policies should prove insufficient under any circumstances.

It is further to be observed that the Phoenix of London policy was for a term of sixteen days only, and it is hardly likely that it was contemplated there would be any change in the composition of the articles on exhibit during this period.

When one comes to the situation under the respondent's policy, which was issued on February 22, 1940, within approximately two weeks of the appellant's policy, it is to be observed that it was to run for a period of three years, and while the face amount of the policy may have been the value at the date of its issue of the particular goods of that description which were actually on the premises at that time. The itemized list formed no part of the policy delivered to the assured, and the description of the property insured was not limited to particular items then on the premises, but was a coverage generally of

meubles faisant partie des collections du musée de l'École du Meuble.

These collections might run to much more or much less in value than $10,000 as the composition thereof might change from time to time within the three-year period. In these circumstances, I am unable, with respect, to see any ground upon which a court could be asked to find that the assured had "adopted" a construction of the appellant's policy which, for reasons already given, that policy cannot on its own language reasonably bear.

[Page 213]

It is further suggested that the permission granted by para. 5 may be restricted to additional insurance on the buildings only, and thus bring about a result under which the paragraph does not come in any way in conflict with the language of para. 1 with respect to contents. In my opinion, it is sufficient to say that para. 5 does not purport to be limited to additional insurance on buildings and the appellant does not so contend.

As to the suggestion that the "montant total" would be increased if specific insurance were placed on some items, with the result that the appellant's insurance remained on the remainder, this may be true enough, but the idea behind the paragraph is that if the permission is acted upon the result will be, in all cases, more protection for the assured, not less. The Phoenix of London policy affords a good example. When it was effected the total insurance on the contents became $103,000, but under the appellant's contention, the result was that $2,542 value became uninsured. Such a situation might well be aggravated if further insurance were placed on other specific goods. Moreover, had the Phoenix of London policy covered all the contents, instead of being limited to part only, the result, according to the argument of the appellant, would have been that the appellant and its group would have ceased to be on the risk, and the assured would have been left with $3,000 insurance only. To be consistent, Mr. Campbell was obliged to go, and did go, this far. Thus, in seeking to "augment" his total insurance with the permission granted by para. 5 so to do, the assured would have actually reduced his protection almost to the vanishing point. The parties might, of course, have so contracted, but only, in my view, by clear words not to be found at all in para. 5 as it stands. Such a result can, in my opinion, be reached only by reading into the paragraph words which are not there, in violation of the fundamental canon of construction applicable to a contract of this nature, namely, that it is to be construed contra proferentem.

With respect to the third of the possible meanings of the words "autrement assuré" set out above, paras. 2 and 3 of the appellant's policy are relevant. Under their provisions the insurance is to extend to everything belonging to the assured, as well as to goods which it has sold but

[Page 214]

not delivered and goods in its possession on consignment; or for repair or on any basis involving responsibility on the part of the assured for them. The insurance is also to cover goods bought on "conditional sale" contracts. In any of these situations where the assured would not have an absolute title, it might very well be that, in many instances, insurance would have been placed on the goods by the other persons interested in them, such as, for instance, by an unpaid vendor. It is not unusual in such circumstances for an unpaid vendor in his insurance to cover also the interest of the purchaser in the goods. An example of such a situation is afforded by the circumstances in Keefer v. Phoenix Ins. Co. 13.

It may very well have been in the contemplation of the parties in the case at bar that the appellant's policy should not apply in similar circumstances so as to oblige the appellant and the other members of the group to contribute in any way to indemnify the assured when its interest would be covered by such other insurance. This view of the language of para. 1 acquires additional strength from the fact that under para. 5 it is "l'assurée" who is authorized to augment or diminish the total amount of "ses assurances."

This is a reasonable construction of the language used, and when the policy is so construed all its provisions are brought into harmony. If for any reason, however, this is not the true view, the result, in my opinion, is that the ambiguous words to be found in para. 1 cannot stand with the clear language actually used in para. 5, and being repugnant thereto, they fall to the ground. It is impossible to write out of the policy the clear provisions of para. 5 or to amend it so as to give to the ambiguous words of para. 1 the meaning for which the appellant contends.

The insurance provided by the respondent's policy, therefore, being authorized by the terms of para. 5, it came within the words "any other insurance on the property herein described" (that is, described in the appellant's policy) in statutory condition 9, and the appellant is bound to contribute rateably with respect to the loss.

[Page 215]

The appellant next contends that the respondent was in any event not entitled to sue, as the "subrogation" in writing is signed only by the president of the assured, whereas the incorporating statute, 16 Geo. V, c. 49, s. 4, prescribes as follows:

The signatures of the president or of the vice-president and of the secretary-treasurer shall suffice in all legal matters of the corporation.

Assuming that this contention is well taken, the Government of the Province of Quebec, to whom the loss is payable under the policy, is also a party, and the document as executed was authorized by Order in Council. In Guerin v. Manchester 14, it was held that a party to whom, as in the case at bar, loss under a fire insurance policy is payable, is entitled to sue and that this right of action may be assigned. In the case at bar, the provisions of Articles 1570 and 1571 of the Civil Code were met, so that the appellant is in a position to maintain its action claiming through the Government of the Province, regardless of any defect in his title as claiming through the assured; Bank of Toronto v. St. Lawrence Fire Ins. Co. 15. I think, therefore, the appeal should be dismissed with costs.

Estey J.:—La Corporation des Écoles Techniques ou Professionnelles, the insured, entered into contracts of insurance, identical in terms, with the appellant and several other companies on February 7, 1940, for a total insurance of $250,000, apportioned $150,000 upon the buildings and $100,000 on the contents. The appellant's share was $150,000.

On February 22, 1940, the insured entered into a contract of insurance with the respondent in the sum of $10,000 on the "Objets d'Art et des meubles faisant partie des collections du musée de l'École du Meuble, . . . ." (hereinafter referred to as "objets d'art"). These were a part of the contents of the building and initially included under the appellant's policy.

On June 2, 1940, a fire occurred by which the insured suffered a total loss of $83,922.67 in respect of both buildings and contents. The loss of the "objets d'art," etc., as insured by the respondent, totalled $7,070.53. The respondent paid the full amount and, as the appellant denied any

[Page 216]

liability to pay a pro rata share, this action is brought to recover that share in the sum of $1,939.85. If liability be found, the amount of $1,939.85 is not contested.

The learned trial judge dismissed the action. The majority of the Appellate Court 16, Mr. Justice St-Jacques and Mr. Justice Hyde dissenting, allowed the appeal.

The appellant's policy provided :

L'on entendra

1o par bâtiments: les immeubles mêmes, leurs annexes et allonges communicantes, les couloirs reliant les bâtiments, les cheminées et le tunnel, et tout aménagement fixe à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur.

par contenu: tout ce qui se trouve dans les immeubles et qui n'est pas autrement assuré. A titre indicatif seulement: l'ameublement, les livres, les œuvres d'art, les objets exécutés ou en voie d'exécution, . . . . les objets exclus par l'article 7 des conditions statutaires reproduites dans la police et, enfin, les effets et les choses appartenant aux élèves et aux professeurs.

The appellant contends that, by virtue of the words "qui n'est pas autrement assuré," when the respondent placed its insurance on "objets d'art" these "objets" were no longer covered by its policy.

The respondent contends that appellant consented to this further insurance within the meaning of Statutory Conditions Nos. 8 and 9 and, therefore, the appellant and its co-insurers must pay a pro rata share of the loss; that, in so far as the words "qui n'est pas autrement assuré" be relied upon to prevent that result, they constitute a variation of Condition No. 9 which, not being endorsed on the policy in conspicuous type and in ink of different colour, as required by s. 241 of the Insurance Act (R.S.Q. 1941, c. 299), is not binding upon the insured.

The appellant's policy also provided:

L'assurée s'engage à maintenir en vigueur une assurance de mêmes forme, teneur et portée au montant total de $250,000, divisé à raison de $150,000 sur les bâtiments et de $100,000 sur le contenu. Si elle ne se conforme pas à cette convention, l'assurée deviendra co-assureur pour le déficit.

This policy further provided:

L'assurée est autorisée:

a) à augmenter ou à diminuer le montant total de ses assurances sans en avertir les assureurs; ceux-ci renoncent au préavis pour toute assurance souscrite antérieurement ou postérieurement au présent contrat. Cette prérogative ne libérera pas l'assurée, cependant, de la convention relative au montant minimum d'assurance mentionné précédemment.

[Page 217]

The relevant paragraphs in the appellant's policy quoted above are, for convenience, hereinafter referred to as paras. 1, 2 and 3. The words "bâtiments" and "contenu," in the first paragraph, are described with such particularity as to leave no doubt but that they were prepared in a manner to justify the adoption of Lord Watson's view that they should be regarded as "the deliberate act of both parties." Birrell v. Dryer 17.

The possibility of further insurance upon both buildings and contents, or either, was obviously present to the minds of the parties as they completed the contracts of insurance of which the appellant's is one. Only in relation to the contents did they adopt the words "qui n'est pas autrement assuré" and make them part of the sentence describing the subject matter and the peril insured. Though expressed in the past tense, the parties have construed these words as referring to insurance to be subsequently placed. As insurer, the appellant has so construed these words, at least from the moment this claim was made. That the insured so construed them from the outset is evidenced by the fact that within fifteen days after the appellant's policy became effective it insured the "objets d'art" up to their full insurable value. A few months later, May 31, 1940, the insured entered into a still further contract of insurance with the Phoenix Assurance Company, Limited of London, England, upon certain contents loaned to the institution. At the time the appellant's policy was taken out there was no other insurance upon the property. It should also be noted that the respondent has brought this action on the basis that these words applied to subsequent insurance and has so contended throughout this litigation.

When the parties are in agreement as to the meaning of a provision, a court, in the absence of compelling reasons to the contrary, should construe the document in accord therewith. Adolph Lumber Company v. Meadow Creek Lumber Company 18, Forbes v. Watt 19; Pollock on Contracts, 13th Ed., 373.

[Page 218]

On the basis of this construction, and leaving aside, for the moment, the respondent's contention, the position here is not unlike that where the steamer "Baltic" was insured against fire "whilst running on the inland lakes, rivers and canals during the season of navigation" and when "laid up in a place of safety during winter months from any extra hazardous building." The ship had been laid up for a period of approximately three years prior to the fire and it was held that in that circumstance the ship was not covered. Mr. Justice Sedgewick wrote the judgment of the Court and stated :

The stipulation in question is in no sense a condition but rather a description of the subject matter insured. It is descriptive of and has reference solely to the risk covered by the policy and not to the happening of an event which by the statutory conditions would render the policy void. The statute, therefore, does not apply.

The London Assurance Corporation v. The Great Northern Transit Company 20.

Where the policies insuring ten houses contained a provision "while occcupied by . . . . as a dwelling-house," it was held that if, at the time of the loss, one of the houses was unoccupied or otherwise used, it was not covered.

While vacant, as they were for many months prior to, and at the time of, the fire because of failure to rent them, the houses in respect of which it has been held that the plaintiffs cannot recover did not answer the description of the subject matter in the policy and were therefore not covered by the insurance.

Mr. Justice Anglin (later C.J.) in Ross v. Scottish Union and National Insurance Company 21.

In a fire insurance policy the words "only while the premises are occupied as a private dwelling" were held to be words of description. Riddell J.A. stated:

Unless there is something in the policy itself or in the legislation to take the present out of the authority of the cases cited, the company have a perfect defence, as the building at the time of the fire was not "occupied as a private dwelling," it was not occupied at all . . . . what is suggested as such is not a stipulation at all, it is part of the description of the property insured as the cases cited above conclusively compel us to hold.

Cooper v. Toronto Casualty Ins. Co. 22.

[Page 219]

See also Schmidt v. Home Insurance Co. 23.

The contract of insurance must describe the property and the risk or peril insured against. It was the "Baltic," not at all times, but as described in the policy, that constituted the subject matter and the peril insured against. In the same manner it was the houses only while occupied. These are distinguishable from those cases where there is a description of the property and the peril and then, in the contract, a provision that the risk will be varied or altered by the failure on the part of the insured to maintain or observe an undertaking on its part. In W. Malcolm Mackay Company v. British America Assurance Company 24, the policy insuring lumber against loss or damage by fire contained the following clause:

Warranted by the insured that a clear space of 300 feet shall be maintained between the property hereby insured and any standing wood, brush or forest and any sawmill or other special hazard.

Duff J. (later C.J.) stated at p. 344:

The description embraces, I think, any lumber of the insured company so situated, and the clause in question cannot, I think, be read as importing merely a qualification of this description. I think it is a warranty against the presence of any of the lumber of the insured company within the prohibited space.

See also St. Paul Lumber Company, Limited v. British Crown Assurance Corporation, Limited 25; Fidelity-Phenix Fire Insurance Company of New York v. McPherson 26; Palatine Ins. Co. v. Gregory 27.

Parties are at liberty to select the subject matter and peril to be insured. In so far as the words chosen constitute a part of the description, they are not, under the foregoing authorities, a stipulation within the meaning of s. 240 of the Quebec Insurance Act. In appellant's policy, that portion of the description here in question reads:

par contenu: tout ce qui se trouve dans les immeubles et qui n'est pas autrement assuré.

The last portion of this sentence is an essential part of the description and, as such, does not constitute a stipulation within the meaning of s. 240. In the Cooper case supra Mr. Justice Middleton expressed his disapproval of

[Page 220]

this distinction and suggested legislative action. Ontario thereafter amended its s. 106(1), corresponding to s. 240 of the Quebec Act, by adding thereto the words:

nor shall anything contained in the description of the subject matter of the insurance be effective in so far as it is inconsistent with, varies, modifies or avoids such condition.

1929 S. of O., c. 53, s. 12(1).

This amendment was considered in Renshaw v. Phoenix Insurance Company 28. Section 240 of the Quebec Act does not contain a provision similar in effect to that contained in the Ontario amendment of 1929.

The foregoing constitutes an answer to the respondent's contention which may be summarized as follows :

The contents of the buildings were insured from February 7th to February 22nd, 1940. On that day, additional insurance was placed on some of the contents, with the permission of the Defendant. Condition 8 had been complied with. So had condition 9, and "on the happening of any loss or damage", the Defendant is "liable only for the payment of a rateable proportion of such loss or damage."

When, on February 22, 1940, the respondent's policy became effective, the coverage under the appellant's policy upon the same contents was automatically removed. There never was a moment when the appellant's and respondent's policies covered the same contents. That was the position at the time of the loss and, therefore, the provisions of Conditions 8 and 9, which contemplate at the time of the loss an enforceable coverage of the same property, have no relevancy. Home Insurance Co. of New York v. Gavel 29.

The parties hereto do not agree as to the effect of the consent to further insurance provided for in para. 3. The appellant sought to restrict its meaning to only those policies which are "de mêmes forme, teneur et portée" as its own. The respondent, however, contends that the provisions of para. 3 are sufficiently comprehensive to apply to its policy.

The respondent's view relative to the construction of para. 3 is more in accord with the language used. This para. 3 is phrased in rather general terms and the words "le montant total de ses assurances" do not suggest they are limited in their application to "(le) montant total de $250,000" in para. 2 and do not import into para. 3 the

[Page 221]

words "de mêmes forme, teneur et portée" from para. 2. The language of para. 3 appears sufficiently comprehensive to cover the appellant's consent to respondent's policy.

If, however, we assume, as the respondent contends, that the appellant, by virtue of para. 3, consented to the former's policy, that does not alter the position. The language of both policies, including the words "qui n'est pas autrement assuré," notwithstanding the consent, remains the same. In the result, the consent, in relation to respondent's policy, is of no effect and may be looked upon as surplus. This construction does not involve any repugnancy between paras. 1 and 3. Even if these paragraphs be construed in a manner that recognizes some repugnancy, that construction should be avoided, if reasonably possible. Here the language of para. 1 is specific, while that of para. 3 is general. If the general terms of the latter be construed not to apply to the words "qui n'est pas autrement assuré," thereby avoiding the suggested repugnancy, that should be done, particularly if consistent with the intention of the parties as disclosed in relation to the contract as a whole. As stated in the oft-quoted maxim of Bacon, Rule 10:

for all words, whether they be in deeds or statutes, or otherwise, if they be general and not express and precise, shall be restrained unto the fitness of the matter or person.

Moreover, the parties to a contract must be presumed to have attributed a meaning and purpose to its several parts which, when read together, constitute a complete consistent contract and, therefore, repugnancy should be, if reasonably possible, avoided.

This construction, which so limits the general words of para. 3, appears to be most in accord with the intention of the parties, as it would appear they never intended, by this general provision, to contradict the specific words "qui n'est pas autrement assuré." Moreover, this construction does not nullify nor indeed eliminate the necessity for para. 3. The parties, as they completed appellant's contract, would contemplate other insurance in general which would include other policies on the buildings only, or upon the buildings and contents, in language identical to that of the appellant, or otherwise. It is clear that the consent in para. 3 would have meaning and effect as to some of these

[Page 222]

and it is unnecessary here to construe its precise effect in relation to all of them. It is sufficient to observe its effect in relation to the respondent's policy in question in this litigation.

It should be noted that under the appellant's policy the total coverage throughout remained the same. When the respondent's policy became effective it alone covered the contents therein specified, but, by virtue of the appellant's policy remaining in total the same, there was a larger coverage upon the contents.

The policy with the Phoenix Assurance Company, Limited of London, England, placed by the insured on certain borrowed chattels was not equal to the full insurable value of this borrowed property. It was the right of the insured to place such amount thereon as it might decide and no conclusion can be drawn therefrom such as in the respondent's policy, which covered the specified contents up to their full insurable value. The appellant did make an ex gratia payment on account of the loss suffered by the insured, but neither this nor the foregoing circumstance is of assistance in determining the issues raised in this litigation.

The words "qui n'est pas autrement assuré" are a part of the sentence describing the subject matter and peril insured. They limit or qualify that subject matter or peril, but are nevertheless a part of the description. They are not, in this policy, a stipulation contrary to any provision, or any variation, addition or omission to Statutory Conditions 8 and 9 within the meaning of s. 240 of the Quebec Insurance Act.

The appeal is allowed with costs.

Appeal allowed with costs.

Solicitors for the appellant: Brais, Campbell & Mercier.

Solicitors for the respondent: Hackett, Mulvena & Hackett.



1 Q.R. [1951] K.B. 224.

2 55 D.L.R. 95.

3 (1899) 29 Can. S.C.R. 577.

4 [1926] 1 D.L.R. 792.

5 (1918) 58 Can. S.C.R. 169.

6 [1923] S.C.R. 335.

7 55 D.L.R. 95.

8 (1899) 29 Can. S.C.R. 577.

9 Q.R. [1951] K.B. 224.

10 Q.R. [1951] K.B. 224.

11 (1899) 29 Can. S.C.R. 577.

12 [1938] 2 D.L.R. 273.

13 (1900) 31 Can. S.C.R. 144.

14 (1899) 29 Can. S.C.R. 139.

15 [1903] A.C. 59.

16 Q.R. [1951] K.B. 224.

17 (1884) 9 App. Cas. 345 at 354.

18 (1919) 58 Can. S.C.R. 306 at 307.

19 (1872) L.R. 2 Sc. App. 214 at 216.

20 (1899) 29 Can. S.C.R. 577 at 584.

21 (1918) 58 Can. S.C.R. 169 at 179.

22 [1928] 2 D.L.R. 1007 at 1008.

23 [1934] 2 D.L.R. 78.

24 [1923] S.C.R. 335.

25 [1923] S.C.R. 515.

26 [1924] S.C.R. 666.

27 [1926] 1 D.L.R. 792

28 (1943) 10 Ins. L.R. 92.

29 [1927] S.C.R. 481.

 

Lexum

For 20 years now, the Lexum site has been the main public source for Supreme Court decisions.


>

Decisia

 

Efficient access to your decisions

Decisia is an online service for courts, boards and tribunals aiming to provide easy and professional access to their decisions from their own website.

Learn More